Installing and using reverb in Audacity on Ubuntu Linux

So I recently opened up Audacity for what I assumed would be a pretty quick operation. I just wanted to add some reverb to a track I’d recorded at a voice lesson. Sounds like something the Audacity should, in all it’s glory, be able to handle with its eyes closed. Unfortunately it seems I’m mistaken. None of the included filters include this ability. So I went searching. As it turns out, there are different libraries available for Windows, Mac, and Linux as plugins for adding reverb. The Linux ones are not as easy to install (or even find directions on how to install) as I would have liked.

So here’s the short version:

  • Install the plugin – the library which contains the reverb plugin is called Gverb, and is included in a set of libraries categorized under LADSPA plugins. Unfortunately I’m not sure which one, so I just installed all of them. (It’s not a very big install and I didn’t want to go through this trouble again).
                            sudo aptitude install vco-plugins tap-plugins swh-plugins rev-plugins omins mcp-plugins
                    
  • Open Audacity
  • Click on the Effect dropdown, go to Plugins 61-75, click Gverb.
  • From here you’ll have to figure out your own settings, but that’s all you need to add some reverb to you audio recording.

Comments

  1. sweet!

    thanks heaps!

    that installed about 150 plugins in my audacity. I never would have figured that out. Thanks.

  2. Thanks Jeff!

    This line did the job:

    sudo apt-get install vco-plugins tap-plugins swh-plugins rev-plugins omins mcp-plugins

  3. great, this is how far i got. now how do you install it? this doesnt help at all! this is for nerds only. what about the people who dont know how to install on linux and are crying over it?

    • Yep. No Idea how in the hell to install this stuff. I don’t know all the technical ins and outs for Linux. Can you guys put it in english?

      • Open the terminal app. Copy/Paste in the line starting with “sudo” and ending with “mcp-plugins” then enter your password when prompted. This will run for a bit installing things. Then follow the rest of the directions.

  4. THE LINE IN THE INSTRUCTIONS HAS A TYPO!! THIS IS THE CORRECT LINE:

    sudo apt-get install vco-plugins tap-plugins swh-plugins rev-plugins omins mcp-plugins

    For people who’ve never used terminal before, highlight that and copy it, then right-click inside the terminal and paste it.

  5. If it’s only Reverb you want then all you need is either:

    tap-plugins
    or
    rev-plugins.

  6. Tnx man, works like a charm!
    Thank god for reverb for my vocal tracks so I can make them listenable :)

  7. Thank you so much dude!

  8. Péricles says:

    Thanks! Friends!

    Choose THE LINE IN THE INSTRUCTIONS HAS A TYPO!! sudo apt-get install tap-plugins rev-plugins

    reverb is very good

  9. More and more I’m finding there is a great deal of erroneous and / or out dated information about Ubuntu and related applications on the internet including on Ubuntu authorized sites. These instructions by Jeff Ammons are no exception. Judging from the comments, these instructions were probably correct at one time but as of this writing (May 2014) I assure you, after multiple attempts, these instructions are not only incorrect, they are detrimental.
    I am now no longer able to open Audacity even though I have uninstalled and reinstalled Audacity utilizing Synaptic Package Manager.
    I have been trying for several hours to install ladsp and nothing works. For those who may doubt what I’ve written here, I am a Ubuntu newbie, however, I’ve been studying Ubuntu to some extent and I am familiar with “sudo” and it’s purpose.

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